Fashion and Beauty, for Everyone
Fashion for everyone
Beauty for everyone
Body confidence for everyone
Fashion and Beauty, for Everyone
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Think I had a MLP with hair like this when I was little.
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Andy, be serious. You are not trying. You are whining. What is it that you want me to say to you, huh? Do you want me to say, “Poor you. Miranda’s picking on you. Poor you. Poor Andy”? Hmm? Wake up, six. She’s just doing her job.

Don’t you know that you are working at the place that published some of the greatest artists of the century? Halston, Lagerfeld, de la Renta. And what they did, what they created was greater than art because you live your life in it. Well, not you, obviously, but some people. You think this is just a magazine, hmm? This is not just a magazine. This is a shining beacon of hope for… oh, I don’t know… let’s say a young boy growing up in Rhode Island with six brothers pretending to go to soccer practice when he was really going to sewing class and reading Runway under the covers at night with a flashlight.

You have no idea how many legends have walked these halls. And what’s worse, you don’t care. Because this place, where so many people would die to work you only deign to work. And you want to know why she doesn’t kiss you on the forehead and give you a gold star on your homework at the end of the day. Wake up, sweetheart.

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Nigel, The Devil Wears Prada (via mylittlerutabaga)
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"

Andy, be serious. You are not trying. You are whining. What is it that you want me to say to you, huh? Do you want me to say, “Poor you. Miranda’s picking on you. Poor you. Poor Andy”? Hmm? Wake up, six. She’s just doing her job.

Don’t you know that you are working at the place that published some of the greatest artists of the century? Halston, Lagerfeld, de la Renta. And what they did, what they created was greater than art because you live your life in it. Well, not you, obviously, but some people. You think this is just a magazine, hmm? This is not just a magazine. This is a shining beacon of hope for… oh, I don’t know… let’s say a young boy growing up in Rhode Island with six brothers pretending to go to soccer practice when he was really going to sewing class and reading Runway under the covers at night with a flashlight.

You have no idea how many legends have walked these halls. And what’s worse, you don’t care. Because this place, where so many people would die to work you only deign to work. And you want to know why she doesn’t kiss you on the forehead and give you a gold star on your homework at the end of the day. Wake up, sweetheart.

"
Nigel, The Devil Wears Prada (via mylittlerutabaga)
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fabulousandclassy5:

http://fabulousandclassy5.tumblr.com/
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the-widows-of-culloden:

Alexander McQueen A/W 1995: “Highland Rape”
Highland Rape is the most controversial runway show of McQueen’s early career. While he claimed that the inspiration for the show was about England’s rape of Scotland, many critics were convinced that it was romanticizing the rape of women. Always sparking controversy, Lee sent models down the runway in torn clothing, posing in a distraught way; it was all too easy for reviewers to believe that the models were portraying women who had been raped. However, McQueen maintained that he was not a misogynist, and that they had misunderstood the historical reference.
Lee told Time Out Magazine in 1997: “[This collection] was a shout against English designers…doing flamboyant Scottish clothes. My father’s family originates from the Isle of Skye, and I’d studied the history of the Scottish upheavals and the Clearances. People were so unintelligent they thought this was about women being raped- yet Highland Rape was about England’s rape of Scotland.”
McQueen was clearly tired of designers romanticizing Scotland, which he saw in a much more cold light. He slashed lines open in the pieces, and tore apart lace in a violent way that expressed how much Scotland (and its people) were ravaged by the wars. He used his own family’s tartan for many pieces, and would continue to do so in later shows, including 1998’s Joan, and 2006’s The Widows of Culloden. While Highland Rape was seen at the time as angry and violent, this was the show that launched Alexander McQueen into fame, and would spark the heads of LVMH to choose him as John Galliano’s successor at the house of Givenchy. 
the-widows-of-culloden:

Alexander McQueen A/W 1995: “Highland Rape”
Highland Rape is the most controversial runway show of McQueen’s early career. While he claimed that the inspiration for the show was about England’s rape of Scotland, many critics were convinced that it was romanticizing the rape of women. Always sparking controversy, Lee sent models down the runway in torn clothing, posing in a distraught way; it was all too easy for reviewers to believe that the models were portraying women who had been raped. However, McQueen maintained that he was not a misogynist, and that they had misunderstood the historical reference.
Lee told Time Out Magazine in 1997: “[This collection] was a shout against English designers…doing flamboyant Scottish clothes. My father’s family originates from the Isle of Skye, and I’d studied the history of the Scottish upheavals and the Clearances. People were so unintelligent they thought this was about women being raped- yet Highland Rape was about England’s rape of Scotland.”
McQueen was clearly tired of designers romanticizing Scotland, which he saw in a much more cold light. He slashed lines open in the pieces, and tore apart lace in a violent way that expressed how much Scotland (and its people) were ravaged by the wars. He used his own family’s tartan for many pieces, and would continue to do so in later shows, including 1998’s Joan, and 2006’s The Widows of Culloden. While Highland Rape was seen at the time as angry and violent, this was the show that launched Alexander McQueen into fame, and would spark the heads of LVMH to choose him as John Galliano’s successor at the house of Givenchy. 
the-widows-of-culloden:

Alexander McQueen A/W 1995: “Highland Rape”
Highland Rape is the most controversial runway show of McQueen’s early career. While he claimed that the inspiration for the show was about England’s rape of Scotland, many critics were convinced that it was romanticizing the rape of women. Always sparking controversy, Lee sent models down the runway in torn clothing, posing in a distraught way; it was all too easy for reviewers to believe that the models were portraying women who had been raped. However, McQueen maintained that he was not a misogynist, and that they had misunderstood the historical reference.
Lee told Time Out Magazine in 1997: “[This collection] was a shout against English designers…doing flamboyant Scottish clothes. My father’s family originates from the Isle of Skye, and I’d studied the history of the Scottish upheavals and the Clearances. People were so unintelligent they thought this was about women being raped- yet Highland Rape was about England’s rape of Scotland.”
McQueen was clearly tired of designers romanticizing Scotland, which he saw in a much more cold light. He slashed lines open in the pieces, and tore apart lace in a violent way that expressed how much Scotland (and its people) were ravaged by the wars. He used his own family’s tartan for many pieces, and would continue to do so in later shows, including 1998’s Joan, and 2006’s The Widows of Culloden. While Highland Rape was seen at the time as angry and violent, this was the show that launched Alexander McQueen into fame, and would spark the heads of LVMH to choose him as John Galliano’s successor at the house of Givenchy. 
the-widows-of-culloden:

Alexander McQueen A/W 1995: “Highland Rape”
Highland Rape is the most controversial runway show of McQueen’s early career. While he claimed that the inspiration for the show was about England’s rape of Scotland, many critics were convinced that it was romanticizing the rape of women. Always sparking controversy, Lee sent models down the runway in torn clothing, posing in a distraught way; it was all too easy for reviewers to believe that the models were portraying women who had been raped. However, McQueen maintained that he was not a misogynist, and that they had misunderstood the historical reference.
Lee told Time Out Magazine in 1997: “[This collection] was a shout against English designers…doing flamboyant Scottish clothes. My father’s family originates from the Isle of Skye, and I’d studied the history of the Scottish upheavals and the Clearances. People were so unintelligent they thought this was about women being raped- yet Highland Rape was about England’s rape of Scotland.”
McQueen was clearly tired of designers romanticizing Scotland, which he saw in a much more cold light. He slashed lines open in the pieces, and tore apart lace in a violent way that expressed how much Scotland (and its people) were ravaged by the wars. He used his own family’s tartan for many pieces, and would continue to do so in later shows, including 1998’s Joan, and 2006’s The Widows of Culloden. While Highland Rape was seen at the time as angry and violent, this was the show that launched Alexander McQueen into fame, and would spark the heads of LVMH to choose him as John Galliano’s successor at the house of Givenchy. 
the-widows-of-culloden:

Alexander McQueen A/W 1995: “Highland Rape”
Highland Rape is the most controversial runway show of McQueen’s early career. While he claimed that the inspiration for the show was about England’s rape of Scotland, many critics were convinced that it was romanticizing the rape of women. Always sparking controversy, Lee sent models down the runway in torn clothing, posing in a distraught way; it was all too easy for reviewers to believe that the models were portraying women who had been raped. However, McQueen maintained that he was not a misogynist, and that they had misunderstood the historical reference.
Lee told Time Out Magazine in 1997: “[This collection] was a shout against English designers…doing flamboyant Scottish clothes. My father’s family originates from the Isle of Skye, and I’d studied the history of the Scottish upheavals and the Clearances. People were so unintelligent they thought this was about women being raped- yet Highland Rape was about England’s rape of Scotland.”
McQueen was clearly tired of designers romanticizing Scotland, which he saw in a much more cold light. He slashed lines open in the pieces, and tore apart lace in a violent way that expressed how much Scotland (and its people) were ravaged by the wars. He used his own family’s tartan for many pieces, and would continue to do so in later shows, including 1998’s Joan, and 2006’s The Widows of Culloden. While Highland Rape was seen at the time as angry and violent, this was the show that launched Alexander McQueen into fame, and would spark the heads of LVMH to choose him as John Galliano’s successor at the house of Givenchy. 
the-widows-of-culloden:

Alexander McQueen A/W 1995: “Highland Rape”
Highland Rape is the most controversial runway show of McQueen’s early career. While he claimed that the inspiration for the show was about England’s rape of Scotland, many critics were convinced that it was romanticizing the rape of women. Always sparking controversy, Lee sent models down the runway in torn clothing, posing in a distraught way; it was all too easy for reviewers to believe that the models were portraying women who had been raped. However, McQueen maintained that he was not a misogynist, and that they had misunderstood the historical reference.
Lee told Time Out Magazine in 1997: “[This collection] was a shout against English designers…doing flamboyant Scottish clothes. My father’s family originates from the Isle of Skye, and I’d studied the history of the Scottish upheavals and the Clearances. People were so unintelligent they thought this was about women being raped- yet Highland Rape was about England’s rape of Scotland.”
McQueen was clearly tired of designers romanticizing Scotland, which he saw in a much more cold light. He slashed lines open in the pieces, and tore apart lace in a violent way that expressed how much Scotland (and its people) were ravaged by the wars. He used his own family’s tartan for many pieces, and would continue to do so in later shows, including 1998’s Joan, and 2006’s The Widows of Culloden. While Highland Rape was seen at the time as angry and violent, this was the show that launched Alexander McQueen into fame, and would spark the heads of LVMH to choose him as John Galliano’s successor at the house of Givenchy. 
the-widows-of-culloden:

Alexander McQueen A/W 1995: “Highland Rape”
Highland Rape is the most controversial runway show of McQueen’s early career. While he claimed that the inspiration for the show was about England’s rape of Scotland, many critics were convinced that it was romanticizing the rape of women. Always sparking controversy, Lee sent models down the runway in torn clothing, posing in a distraught way; it was all too easy for reviewers to believe that the models were portraying women who had been raped. However, McQueen maintained that he was not a misogynist, and that they had misunderstood the historical reference.
Lee told Time Out Magazine in 1997: “[This collection] was a shout against English designers…doing flamboyant Scottish clothes. My father’s family originates from the Isle of Skye, and I’d studied the history of the Scottish upheavals and the Clearances. People were so unintelligent they thought this was about women being raped- yet Highland Rape was about England’s rape of Scotland.”
McQueen was clearly tired of designers romanticizing Scotland, which he saw in a much more cold light. He slashed lines open in the pieces, and tore apart lace in a violent way that expressed how much Scotland (and its people) were ravaged by the wars. He used his own family’s tartan for many pieces, and would continue to do so in later shows, including 1998’s Joan, and 2006’s The Widows of Culloden. While Highland Rape was seen at the time as angry and violent, this was the show that launched Alexander McQueen into fame, and would spark the heads of LVMH to choose him as John Galliano’s successor at the house of Givenchy. 
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somethingvain:

alexander mcqueen f/w 2006 rtw ‘the widows of culloden’, gemma ward on the runway at paris fashion week
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